Author Topic: cellphones and head-up display  (Read 7806 times)

Offline jumpjack

  • *
  • Posts: 5
  • Karma: +0/-0
    • View Profile
on: February 18, 2008, 04:22:32 AM
Ingredients:
2 bluetooth enabled cellphones
1 WII controller
some glass lens
a wooden structure
a PC program
a cellphone program.

Mix all together.

What do you obtain?

An immersive virtual reality head up display!!!

Technology is available right now, and does not cost so much.
Is anybody able to make it?

The only difficult part, I think, is writing the PC program which sends video stream and the cellphone program which receives it.
All the remaining is already available!

Just mount the cellphones side by side on a solid structure; add 2 lens systems which allow looking at phones from a short distance (2-3 inches); add the WII sensor, and your head-up display is ready!
Much better than having to look at the PC monitor while at same time turning around head to change point of view of screen images!!



Offline bap2703

  • *
  • Posts: 4
  • Karma: +0/-0
    • View Profile
Reply #1 on: February 19, 2008, 09:23:34 AM
I think you'll lose your eyes or see a bad image through lenses.
Have you done any test to see if phones are fast enough to display a video through bluetooth streaming ?



Offline inio

  • Wiki Admin
  • *
  • Posts: 124
  • Karma: +5/-0
    • View Profile
    • my Wii Remote projects
Reply #2 on: February 19, 2008, 11:46:04 PM
The latency of this sort of system would be way too high.  Go for real video glasses - something like this maybe.



Offline jumpjack

  • *
  • Posts: 5
  • Karma: +0/-0
    • View Profile
Reply #3 on: February 20, 2008, 02:05:13 AM
Even if BT has not enough speed, images could be generated "on board" on the phone: I know modern phones allow playing 3d games.



Offline inio

  • Wiki Admin
  • *
  • Posts: 124
  • Karma: +5/-0
    • View Profile
    • my Wii Remote projects
Reply #4 on: February 20, 2008, 10:40:45 AM
Bandwidth isn't the issue, it's latency.  Cell phones are not known for low-latency display of imagery, and for images generated at the phones, even 15fps is ambitious.  Even worse, hanging two cellphones worth of weight off the front of your head is bound to cause neck strain.  Just buy the real solution and maybe strap some IR LEDs or a wiimote sensor to it to get the head tracking you want.

BTW, a "heads-up display" refers to a transparent overlay on normal vision.  This would be "VR glasses".



Offline jumpjack

  • *
  • Posts: 5
  • Karma: +0/-0
    • View Profile
Reply #5 on: February 21, 2008, 07:35:08 AM
Just buy the real solution and maybe strap some IR LEDs or a wiimote sensor to it to get the head tracking you want.

I didn't understand. What did you mean?!?



Offline inio

  • Wiki Admin
  • *
  • Posts: 124
  • Karma: +5/-0
    • View Profile
    • my Wii Remote projects
Reply #6 on: February 21, 2008, 10:33:04 AM
I assumed the reason for the Wii Remote's involvement was to get motion parallax, in addition to binocular stereo.  The VR glasses will give you binocular stereo, but you'd still need the Wii Remote to track the position of the head to provide motion parallax.



Offline jumpjack

  • *
  • Posts: 5
  • Karma: +0/-0
    • View Profile
Reply #7 on: February 22, 2008, 06:58:00 AM
I assumed the reason for the Wii Remote's involvement was to get motion parallax, in addition to binocular stereo.  The VR glasses will give you binocular stereo, but you'd still need the Wii Remote to track the position of the head to provide motion parallax.
So "real" VR glasses do NOT have head-tracking?!? Sop what's their use?!?



Offline inio

  • Wiki Admin
  • *
  • Posts: 124
  • Karma: +5/-0
    • View Profile
    • my Wii Remote projects
Reply #8 on: February 22, 2008, 10:25:40 AM
I assumed the reason for the Wii Remote's involvement was to get motion parallax, in addition to binocular stereo.  The VR glasses will give you binocular stereo, but you'd still need the Wii Remote to track the position of the head to provide motion parallax.
So "real" VR glasses do NOT have head-tracking?!? Sop what's their use?!?


They have 3DOF tracking of the head's yaw/pitch/roll.  They don't provide translational tracking, which would be needed for motion parallax (JohnnyLee's head tracking demo).  Their big advantage is that they give you binocular stereo, optics, drivers, and good mech and ergo design.
« Last Edit: February 22, 2008, 10:28:54 AM by inio »